Broadford’s green fingered growers

Pictured after a day's hard work at the site in Broadford are local youth club members Callum Musgrave, Ross Johnston, Tyler Stuart, Cameron Morrison, Matthew Culbertson and Harry Partridge

Pictured after a day’s hard work at the site in Broadford are local youth club members Callum Musgrave, Ross Johnston, Tyler Stuart, Cameron Morrison, Matthew Culbertson and Harry Partridge

For the last 18 months the Broadford and Strath Community Company on Skye has been operating a ‘Green Growers’ scheme, encouraging local people to grow their own food and reduce waste.

Funding from the Climate Challenge Fund has helped install polytunnels and raised beds, while the company has been involved in running short training courses to give people the basic skills needed to grow their own produce.

The project — which is part of a wider drive to reduce the community’s CO2 emissions — has transformed an overgrown, clear-felled site on the edge of Broadford village into a thriving allotment garden for community use.

Local restaurants, hotels and schools can also now participate by composting their green waste for use on the site. Previously this waste would have been transported as landfill to Falkirk.

In a partnership between the community company and the West Highland College, the site has proved an excellent training facility for their crofting and countryside skills students. Three training courses on composting and growing your own food attracted 45 participants, 13 of whom later became allotment tenants.

Alison MacLennan, chair of the Broadford Community Woodland Management Group who oversee the project, said: “This project has been a tremendous success and could not have been achieved without the goodwill and hard work of the numerous volunteers, tutors and students who have given freely of their time to support this initiative. We are greatly encouraged by the number of people who have embraced the composting approach, those who now think twice about recycling and reusing materials and the demand for indoor growing space.”

Anyone wishing to get involved should contact Nicholas Kelly on 07572655455 or email nicktorrin@hotmail.com.